Forum Posts

Admin • CHR
Mar 14, 2022
In Brazil • Spotting
Teresina–Senador Petrônio Portella Airport (IATA: THE, ICAO: SBTE) is the airport serving Teresina, Brazil. Since December 22, 1999 it is named after Petrônio Portella Nunes (1925-1980) a former Mayor of Teresina, Governor of Piauí, Senator and Minister of Justice who had a key role in preparing the end of the Brazilian military government. The airport was commissioned on September 30, 1967 and since December 23, 1974 it is operated by Infraero. The airport underwent major renovations between 1998 and 2001, including the passenger terminal, runway and the construction of a new control tower. Previously operated by Infraero, on April 7, 2021 CCR won a 30-year concession to operate the airport.
Teresina • Senador Petrônio Portella Airport [THE/SBTE] Brazil content media
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Admin • CHR
Feb 12, 2022
In Italy • Spotting
Bari Karol Wojtyła Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Bari-Karol Wojtyła) (IATA: BRI, ICAO: LIBD) is an airport serving the city of Bari in Italy. It is approximately 8 km (5.0 mi) northwest from the town centre. Named after Pope John Paul II, who was born Karol Wojtyła, the airport is also known as Palese Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Palese) after a nearby neighbourhood. The airport handled 5 545 588 passengers in 2019. The airport of Bari was originally a military airfield, built in the 1930s, by the Regia Aeronautica. During World War II Italian Campaign, it was seized by the British Eighth Army in late September 1943, and turned into an Allied military airfield. Until the end of the war in May 1945, it was used by the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Forces both as an operational airfield as well as a command and control base. In addition, the airfield was used by the Italian Co-Belligerent Air Force (Aviazione Cobelligerante Italiana, or ACI), or Air Force of the South (Aeronautica del Sud). After the war, it was turned over to the postwar Air Force of the Italian Republic (Aeronautica Militare Italiana). In the 1960s, it was opened to civil flights and Alitalia schedules regular flights to Rome, Catania, Palermo, Ancona, Venice. The routes were later taken over by ATI, using a Fokker F27 airplane. When ATI put into operation the new DC-9-30 it became necessary to create a new runway, while the military complex was still used as passenger terminal. In 1981, a new building was completed, originally intended to be used as a cargo terminal, but it became in fact the airport's new passenger terminal. In 1990, with the 1990 FIFA World Cup, the runway was extended and the terminal was upgraded, going through a further renovation in 2000. However, the traffic increase showed the infrastructural limitations of the airport and in 2002 the founding stone of the new passenger terminal was laid out. At the same time, flight infrastructures (aircraft parking areas, runway etc.) were upgraded. In 2005, the new terminal was completed and opened to passengers. In 2005, construction works for a new control tower began and they were completed the following year. In 2006, a further extension of the runway was begun, and in 2007, the planning of an extension of the passenger terminals was commissioned. They were upgraded in 2005–2006 with the opening of a new passenger terminal equipped with 4 jet bridges and a multistorey car park.
Bari • Karol Wojtyła Airport [BRI/LIBD] Italy content media
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Admin • CHR
Jan 08, 2022
In Liberia • Spotting
Roberts International Airport (IATA: ROB, ICAO: GLRB), informally also known as Robertsfield, is an international airport in the West African nation of Liberia. Located near the town of Harbel in Margibi County, the single runway airport is about 56 km outside of the nation's capital of Monrovia, and as an origin and destination point is referred to as "Monrovia" and locally is often referred to simply as "RIA." The airport is named in honor of Joseph Jenkins Roberts, the first President of Liberia. In 1942, Liberia signed a Defense Pact with the United States. This commenced a period of strategic road building and other construction related to US military interests in checking the expansion of the Axis powers. The airport was originally built by the U.S. government as an Air Force base as part of these activities. The story of Robertsfield is consistently intertwined with the history of Pan American World Airways. In fact, from the end of World War II until 1985, the airport was administered and operated by Pan American under contract with the Republic of Liberia's Ministry of Transport. Monrovia was consistently a key link in Pan American's African network, usually an intermediate stop between Accra and Dakar, from which service continued onward to Europe and New York. Now the airport is the nation's busiest and most important aviation facility, currently hosting the country's only scheduled commercial airline services, with direct connections to several major cities in West Africa as well as flights to Europe on Air France and Brussels Airlines. The airport reportedly served 228,000 passengers annually in 2018 and recently underwent a major expansion, including the opening of a new passenger terminal.
Monrovia • Roberts International Airport [ROB/GLRB] Liberia content media
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Admin • CHR
May 18, 2021
In Greece • Spotting
Santorini (Thira) International Airport is an airport in Santorini/Thira, Greece (IATA: JTR, ICAO: LGSR), located north of the village of Kamari. The airport serves both as a military and a civil airport. With its relatively small apron, as of 2018 the airport is only able to serve up to six civilian planes at the same time. Santorini is one of the few Cyclades Islands with a major airport. The airport is located about 6 km southeast of the centre of the city of Thira. The main asphalt runway (16L-34R) is 2125m in length. The parallel taxiway was built to runway specification and is labeled 16R-34L. The airfield can accommodate medium sized jets like the Boeing 757, Boeing 737 and Airbus 320 series as well as smaller aircraft such as the Avro RJ, Fokker 70, and ATR 72. Scheduled airlines include Ryanair, Olympic Air and Aegean Airlines, with seasonal scheduled and charter flights from other airlines ( Transavia , Edelweiss , Easyjet , TUI ) during the higher seasons in spring, summer and autumn. Transportation to and from the air terminal is through buses, taxis, hotel car-pickups and hired cars. The airport first operated in 1972. In December 2015 the privatisation of Santorini (Thira) International Airport and 13 other regional airports of Greece was finalised with the signing of the agreement between the Fraport AG/Copelouzos Group joint venture and the state privatisation fund. According to the agreement, the joint venture will operate the 14 airports (including Santorini (Thira) International Airport) for 40 years as of 11 April 2017.
Santorin • Thira Int'l Airport [JTR/LGSR] Greece content media
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Admin • CHR
Oct 19, 2020
In United Kingdom • Spotting
Inverness Airport (IATA: INV, ICAO: EGPE) is an international airport situated at Dalcross, 7 NM (13 km; 8.1 mi) north-east of the city of Inverness, Scotland. It is owned by Highlands and Islands Airports Limited (HIAL). The airport is the main gateway for travellers to Inverness and the North of Scotland with a range of scheduled services throughout the United Kingdom, and various scheduled services to Continental Europe. Charter and freight flights operate throughout the UK and Europe. The airfield was built by the Air Ministry in 1940 as Royal Air Force station Dalcross (RAF Dalcross), and was in use during the Second World War. The airport was opened for civil operations in 1947. British European Airways, one of the predecessors of British Airways, commenced flights to London-Heathrow in the mid-1970s using a combination of Hawker Siddeley Trident jets and Vickers Viscounts. In the late 1970s and early 1980s there were two daily flights between Inverness and Heathrow; however, the route was discontinued in 1983 on the grounds of poor financial performance. Dan-Air inherited the service and offered a three-times daily service. When Dan Air was bought by British Airways in 1992, the flag carrier retained the service for a further five years, adding a fourth daily frequency shortly before withdrawing the link, amid considerable controversy and public anger, in 1997. The emergence of EasyJet as a force in UK aviation coincided with the launch of a daily service to London-Luton in 1996. The airport is a hub on the Highlands and Islands network where flights between the islands, and other UK and European destinations connect. easyJet is currently the largest operator at Inverness, followed by Loganair. Latest figures state 946,391 passengers passed through the airport in 2019. The airport is also headquarters to Dalcross Handling which now operates across Scotland.
Inverness • Int'l Airport [INV/EGPA] Scotland - UK content media
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Admin • CHR
Oct 19, 2020
In United Kingdom • Spotting
Belfast International Airport (IATA: BFS, ICAO: EGAA) is an airport 11.5 NM (21.3 km) northwest of Belfast in Northern Ireland. Formerly known as Aldergrove Airport, after the nearby village of Aldergrove. In 2018, over 6.2 million passengers travelled through the airport, marking a 7.4% increase compared with 2017. It features flights to some European metropolitan and several leisure destinations as well as a seasonal route to Orlando in the United States. The site for the airport was established in 1917, when it was selected to be a Royal Flying Corps training establishment during the First World War. Civil traffic began in 1922, when flights were conducted to fly newspapers from Chester. The first scheduled passenger service was started in 1933 by the Scottish airline Midland & Scottish Air Ferries. A new terminal and apron were built, with the necessary passenger facilities, and the complex was opened by Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother on 28 October 1963. The first regular jet service to London–Gatwick started in 1966, and in 1968 Aer Lingus and BOAC introduced scheduled services to New York City via Shannon and Glasgow-Prestwick respectively. Belfast International has a CAA Public Use Aerodrome Licence that allows flights for the public transport of passengers or for flying instruction. The airfield was previously shared with the Royal Air Force base RAF Aldergrove, which closed in 2008. The base is now known as Joint Helicopter Command Flying Station, Aldergrove, and both runways are now owned by the airport. The airport is owned and operated by VINCI Airports which was previously owned by ADC & HAS.
Belfast • Int'l Airport [BFS/EGAA] Northern Ireland - UK content media
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Admin • CHR
Oct 06, 2020
In Germany • Spotting
Berlin Brandenburg Airport "Willy Brandt" (German: Flughafen Berlin Brandenburg „Willy Brandt“) (IATA: BER, ICAO: EDDB) is an new Berlin international airport and main airport of the capital of Germany, just south of the former East Berlin Schönefeld Airport (Flughafen Berlin-Schönefeld ) (IATA: SXF, ICAO: EDDB) was the secondary international airport of Berlin. It is located 18 km southeast of Berlin near the town of Schönefeld in the state of Brandenburg and borders Berlin's southern boundary. It is the smaller of the two airports in Berlin, after Berlin Tegel Airport. In 2017 the airport handled 12.9 million passengers by serving mainly European metropolitan and leisure destinations. Schönefeld Airport was the major civil airport of East Germany (GDR) and the only airport of the former East Berlin. Which opened as an airfield to accommodate the local Henschel aircraft plant on 15 October 1934. On 22 April 1945, Soviet troops occupied the airfield as part of the Battle of Berlin. In 1946, the headquarters of the Soviet Air Forces moved to Schönefeld from Johannisthal Air Field. During the following years Schönefeld Airport became the most important civilian airport in the newly founded German Democratic Republic (East Germany), with national flag carrier Interflug based there. In 1976, the modern passenger terminal, currently known as Terminal A, opened. On 31 October 2020 the Schönefeld name and airport code are slated to cease use with large parts of its infrastructure being incorporated into the new Berlin Brandenburg Airport (IATA: BER, ICAO: EDDB) as its Terminal 5 with its sections renamed to L, K, Q and M. Schönefeld's terminal buildings are intended to be used until at least 2026 with Ryanair as their primary tenant. Berlin Brandenburg Airport would become the third busiest airport in Germany surpassing Düsseldorf Airport and make it one of the fifteenth busiest in Europe.
Berlin • Brandenburg Willy Brandt / Schönefeld Airport [ BER / SXF - EDDB ] Germany content media
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Admin • CHR
Oct 06, 2020
In Germany • Spotting
Berlin Tempelhof Airport (German: Flughafen Berlin-Tempelhof) (IATA: THF, ICAO: EDDI) was one of the first airports in Berlin, Germany. Situated in the south-central Berlin borough of Tempelhof-Schöneberg, the airport ceased operating in 2008 amid controversy, leaving Tegel and Schönefeld as the two main airports serving the city, with the new Berlin Brandenburg Airport still under construction as of 2020. Tempelhof was designated as an airport by the Reich Ministry of Transport on 8 October 1923. The old terminal was originally constructed in 1927. In anticipation of increasing air traffic, the Nazi government began a massive reconstruction in the mid-1930s. While it was occasionally cited as the world's oldest operating commercial airport, the title was disputed by several other airports, and is no longer an issue since its closure. Tempelhof was one of Europe's three iconic pre-World War II airports, the others being London's now defunct Croydon Airport and the old Paris–Le Bourget Airport. It acquired a further iconic status as the centre of the Berlin Airlift of 1948–49. One of the airport's most distinctive features is its massive, canopy-style roof extending over the apron, able to accommodate most contemporary airliners in the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s, protecting passengers from the elements. Tempelhof Airport's main building was once among the twenty largest buildings on earth, but it also formerly contained the world's smallest duty-free shop. Tempelhof Airport closed all operations on 30 October 2008, despite the efforts of some protesters to prevent the closure. The former airfield has subsequently been used as a recreational space known as Tempelhofer Feld.
Berlin • Tempelhof Airport [THL-EDDI] Germany content media
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Admin • CHR
Oct 03, 2020
In Canada • Spotting
Montréal–Mirabel International Airport (IATA: YMX, ICAO: CYMX), originally called Montréal International Airport, widely known as Mirabel and branded as YMX International Aerocity of Mirabel (YMX Aérocité internationale de Mirabel), is a cargo and former international passenger airport in Mirabel, Quebec, Canada, 39 km; (24 mi) northwest of Montreal. It opened on October 4, 1975, and the last commercial passenger flight took off on October 31, 2004. The main role of the airport today is cargo flights, but it is also home to MEDEVAC and general aviation flights, and is a manufacturing base for Bombardier Aerospace and Airbus Canada, where final assembly of regional jet (CRJ700, CRJ900 and CRJ1000) aircraft and the Airbus A220 (formerly Bombardier CSeries) is conducted. The former passenger terminal apron is now a racing course, and the terminal building was demolished in 2016. Prior to the demolition of the terminal, Montréal–Mirabel International Airport was classified as an airport of entry by Nav Canada and was staffed by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). A smaller AOE is still available at the Hélibellule FBO. It was one of two airports in Canada with sufficient right-of-way that can be expanded to accommodate 50 million passengers per year, the other being Toronto Pearson International Airport. A lack of traffic meant that Mirabel was never expanded beyond its first phase. It is one of only two non-capital airports with fewer than 200,000 passengers a year to be part of the National Airports System. The airport was intended to replace the existing Dorval Airport as the eastern air gateway to Canada. Accordingly, from 1975 to 1997, all international flights to and from Montreal (except for flights to and from the United States) were required to use Mirabel. However, Mirabel's distant location, the lack of adequate transport links to urban centres and the continued operation of domestic flights from Dorval Airport made Mirabel very unpopular with travellers and airlines. It did not help that Montreal's economy declined relative to that of Toronto during the 1970s and 1980s. As a result, passenger levels never approached the levels that had been anticipated, and indeed remained lower than what Dorval could handle when renovated. When the decision was made to consolidate Montreal's passenger traffic at one airport, Dorval was chosen, and Mirabel was relegated to the role of a cargo airport. Mirabel thus turned out to be a white elephant. Dorval Airport was renamed Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, after the Canadian Prime Minister whose government initiated the Mirabel project, the aim of which was to close and replace the Dorval airport. By surface area, it was the largest airport in the world that had ever been envisioned, with a planned area of 39,660 hectares (396.6 km2; 98,000 acres); King Fahd International Airport in Saudi Arabia, completed in 1999, eventually surpassed its surface area. In 1989, 32,780 hectares (81,000 acres) of the 39,660 hectares (98,000 acres) were deeded back to their original owners. Today, Montréal–Mirabel International Airport is used almost exclusively for cargo flights, with passenger operations having ceased on October 31, 2004, 29 years after the airport's opening and many years of limited, primarily charter service. Bombardier Aerospace launches newly constructed units from its factory at Mirabel. FLICKR - GLOBAL PLANESPOTTING links : https://www.flickr.com/groups/14623342@N20/
Montréal • Mirabel Int'l Airport [YMX/CYMX] QC. Canada content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 28, 2020
In France • Spotting
Lille Airport (French: Aéroport de Lille) (IATA: LIL, ICAO: LFQQ) is an airport located in Lesquin, 7 km (4 mi) south-southeast of Lille, a city in northern France. It is also known as Lille-Lesquin Airport or Lesquin Airport. Lille is the principal city of the Lille Métropole, the capital of the Nord-Pas de Calais region and the prefecture of the Nord department. There is a shuttle bus between the Airport and Lille Flanders railway station. The airport is 15 minutes from the city centre of Lille. It is the 12th busiest French airport in number of passengers: around 970,000 passengers in 2001 and 1,397,637 passengers in 2012. In terms of cargo, it ranks fourth, with almost 38,000 tonnes passing through each year.
Lille • Lesquin Airport [LIL/LFQQ] France content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 28, 2020
In France • Spotting
Montpellier–Méditerranée Airport or Aéroport de Montpellier–Méditerranée (IATA: MPL, ICAO: LFMT), also known as Fréjorgues Airport, is an airport in southern France. It is located 7 km (4 nautical miles) east-southeast of Montpellier in Mauguio, in the Hérault department of the Languedoc-Roussillon region in France. The airport opened in 1946, 8 years after the first flight to the area. The airport carries the 10th largest number of passengers in France (over 1.18 million in 2010). A campus of the École nationale de l'aviation civile (French civil aviation university) is also located at the airport. The airport resides at an elevation of 17 feet (5 m) above mean sea level. It has two asphalt paved runways: 13L/31R is 2,600 by 50 metres (8,530 ft × 164 ft) and 13R/31L is 1,100 by 30 metres (3,609 ft × 98 ft)
Montpellier • Méditerranée Airport [MPL/LFMT] France content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 28, 2020
In France • Spotting
Lorient South Brittany Airport or Aéroport de Lorient Bretagne Sud (IATA: LRT, ICAO: LFRH), also known as Lorient-Lann-Bihoué Airport, is the airport serving the city of Lorient. It is situated 5 km west-northwest of Lorient, a commune of the Morbihandépartement in the Brittanyregion of France. The airport is comparatively large, 3 km by 3 km, which is due to its being built during the Second World War to support German submarine operations from the nearby base in Lorient. It is also known as Lann Bihoue Naval Air Base (Base Aéronavale de Lann Bihoué) and is one of the French Naval Aviation bases, currently hosting: Two combat squadrons (flottilles) (11F, 17F) equipped with Dassault Rafale M aircraft, suitable to fly naval and land combat and recce missions and nuclear deterrence missions One interception squadron (12F) equipped with Dassault Rafale M aircraft, assuring air superiority One airborne radar squadron (4F) equipped with Grumman E-2C Hawkeye aircraft, to secure the skies over the fleet and to control air-traffic One training/mission preparation unit These units also form the airwing which is assigned to the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle.
Lorient • Lann-Bihoué Airport [LRT/LFRH] France content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 28, 2020
In France • Spotting
Strasbourg Airport (French: Aéroport de Strasbourg; German: Straßburg Flughafen) (IATA: SXB, ICAO: LFST) is a minor international airport located in Entzheim and 10 km west-southwest of Strasbourg, both communes of the Bas-Rhin département in the Alsace région of France. In 2018 the airport served 1,297,177 passengers. There was a decline in traffic after Ryanair suspended service in 2004 after a court declared that the airline had received illegal subsidies from the airport. Air Inter Flight 148, a flight inbound from Lyon, France, struck a mountain side near Mont St.Odile on 20 January 1992 on descent during the final leg of the approach for Strasbourg's runway 05, killing 87 people After the opening of the first phase of the new LGV Est high-speed rail line from Paris to Strasbourg, there was a significant reduction in plane usage, but since 2011, traffic at the airport has grown. However, Air France ceased to operate the route between Strasbourg and Paris-Charles de Gaulle on 2 April 2013, transferring passengers onto rail services operated as tgvair. The opening of the second phase of the LGV Est in July 2016 further reduced travel time to Paris to 1:48 by train. The airport consists of a single two-storey passenger terminal building. The ground floor features the check-in areas as well as the arrivals facilities with three baggage claim belts. The upper floor contains the international and domestic departure lounges and gates. The terminal is equipped with four gates that have jet-bridges as well as some walk-boarding stands. FLICKR - GLOBAL PLANESPOTTING
Strasbourg • Entzheim Airport [SXB/LFST] France content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In USA • Spotting
Tampa International Airport (IATA: TPA, ICAO: KTPA, FAA LID: TPA) is an international airport six miles (9.7 km) west of Downtown Tampa, in Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. The airport is publicly owned by Hillsborough County Aviation Authority (HCAA). It has been praised for its architecture and Landside/Airside design of a central terminal (landside) connected by people movers to four satellite air terminals and gates (airsides), a pioneering concept when designed in the late 1960s. The airport was called Drew Field Municipal Airport until 1952. The United States Army Air Corps began negotiating for the use of Drew Field in 1939 during the buildup of military forces prior to World War II. After World War II, the Army Air Forces vacated the facility and Drew Field was returned to the City of Tampa. The Peter O. Knight Airport and Drew Field reversed roles as the main Tampa airport because Drew Field was greatly expanded by the United States Army Air Forces during the war years. Airlines (Eastern Air Lines and National Airlines) moved to Drew Field from Peter O. Knight Airport on Davis Island, which was too small to handle the Douglas DC-4, DC-6 and Lockheed Constellation prop-liners then coming on line in the mid-1940s. During this period, the airlines were housed in the former Drew AAF Base Operations building. Trans Canada Airlines international flights began in 1950 and Drew Field was renamed Tampa International Airport. The airport's second terminal opened in 1952 near the intersection of Columbus Drive and West Shore Blvd. The April 1957 Official Airline Guide shows 30 departures a day on Eastern Air Lines Today, the airport is served by over twenty major air carrier airlines, four regional airlines, and three air cargo carriers. Three of the regional airlines operate under the banner of mainline air carriers, while a fourth, Silver Airways, is independent and utilizes Tampa International Airport as a hub for its operations. Southwest Airlines carries the airport's largest share of passengers, operating up to 121 daily flights. The airport presently serves 93 non-stop destinations throughout North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Europe. The airport handled 22,497,953 passengers in 2019, making it the 28th-busiest airport by passenger movements in North America. FLICKR - GLOBAL PLANESPOTTING - GALLERY
Tampa • International Airport [TPA/KTPA] FL. USA content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Mexico • Spotting
Cancún International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Cancún) (IATA: CUN, ICAO: MMUN) is located in Cancún, Quintana Roo, on the Caribbean coast of Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula. It is Latin America's fourth and Mexico's second busiest airport, after Mexico City International Airport. In 2019, Cancún airport handled 25,481,989 passengers, a 1.1% increase compared to 2018. It has two parallel operative runways that can be used simultaneously. The airport was officially opened in 1974. The airport has been expanding as it has become the second busiest point of entry by air to the country, after Mexico City International Airport. In 2005, ASUR invested US$150 million for the construction of Terminal 3, inaugurated in 2007, and a new runway and a new control tower opened in October 2009. The new 2,800 meters long, 45 meters wide runway was built to the north of the current one; the new control tower is the tallest in Latin America standing at 97 meters tall. The airport is operated by Grupo Aeroportuario del Sureste (ASUR). It is a hub for MAYAir and focus city for Interjet, VivaAerobus, and Volaris; and currently offers flights to over 20 destinations in Mexico and to over 30 countries in North, Central, South America and Europe.
Cancún • International Airport [CUN/MMUN] Mexico content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Canada • Spotting
Ottawa/Rockcliffe Airport or Rockcliffe Airport, (IATA: YRO, ICAO: CYRO), a former military base, is a non-towered airport located on the south shore of the Ottawa River, 4 nautical miles (7.4 km; 4.6 mi) northeast of Downtown Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The airport is the home of the Canada Aviation Museum, which owns the field, and is used and maintained by the Rockcliffe Flying Club. The airport land was originally a military rifle range. In 1918, the Royal Air Force began using the field behind the range for experimental mail flights, and the airport opened officially in 1920 as the Ottawa Air Station, one of the six original airfields opened across Canada by the new Air Board. Since it is on the shore of the Ottawa river and the runways were connected to the riverfront by a road, it was one of very few airports capable of handling and transferring floatplanes on both land and water. On March 12, 1930, Canadian World War I flying ace William George Barker crashed into the Ottawa River and died during an aerial demonstration over the field. In July 1931, Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh visited the airport during their northern surveying tour. During World War II. Rockcliffe participated in the British Commonwealth Air Training Program and many other kinds of testing, training, and transport operations, including flying overseas mail to troops in Europe. The military importance of the airport declined after World War II, since the runways were too short for typical jet operations. The armed forces shifted most operations to RCAF Station Uplands (now Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport) in 1957, and ceased flying operations at Rockcliffe in 1964, retaining the station only as an administrative base, while the Rockcliffe Flying Club began using the field for civilian flying. During the 1970s the airport was also used for scheduled short takeoff and landing (STOL) commercial flights to the short-lived Victoria STOLport near downtown Montreal. The objective was to demonstrate Twin Otter STOL aircraft in downtown areas and avoid longer drives to the Ottawa and Montreal airports. For a variety of reasons STOL operations in downtown settings have not proven successful. The military left the airport completely in 1994, but their aircraft collection remained to form the nucleus of the Canada Aviation Museum. Only one of the former triangle of runways remains active; runways 04/22 and 15/33 were closed along with most taxiways now servicing the aviation museum.
Ottawa • Rockcliffe Airport [YRO/CYRO] ON. Canada content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Norway • Spotting
Oslo Airport, Fornebu (IATA: FBU, ICAO: ENFB) (Norwegian: Oslo lufthavn, Fornebu) was the main airport serving Oslo and Eastern Norway from 1 June 1939 to 7 October 1998. It was then replaced by Oslo Airport, Gardermoen and the area has since been redeveloped. The airport was located at Fornebu in Bærum, 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from the city center. Fornebu had two runways, one 2,370-metre (7,780 ft) 06/24 and one 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) 01/19, and a capacity of 20 aircraft. In 1996, the airport had 170,823 aircraft movements and 10,072,054 passengers. The airport served as a hub for Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS), Braathens SAFE and Widerøe. In 1996, they and 21 other airlines served 28 international destinations. Due to limited terminal and runway capacity, intercontinental and charter airlines used Gardermoen. The Royal Norwegian Air Force retained offices at Fornebu. The airport opened as a combined sea and land airport, serving both domestic and international destinations. It replaced the land airport at Kjeller and the sea airport at Gressholmen. In 1940, it was taken over by the German Luftwaffe, but civilian air services began again in 1946 and it was then taken over by the Norwegian Civil Airport Administration. The airport at first had three runways, each at 800 metres (2,600 ft), but these were gradually expanded, first the north–south runway and finally the east–west one to the current length in 1962. The same year the terminal moved south to the final location. A large-scale expansion to the terminal was made during the 1980s.
Oslo • Fornebu Airport (Closed) [FBU/ENFB] Norway content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Norway • Spotting
Flesland in the city and municipality of Bergen in Vestland county, Norway. Opened in 1955, it is the second-busiest airport in Norway, with 6,306,623 passengers in 2018. Flesland is operated by the state-owned Avinor. Until 1999 Flesland Air Station of the Norwegian Air Force was co-located at the airport. Scandinavian Airlines (SAS), Norwegian Air Shuttle and Widerøe are the largest airlines operating at the airport. The route to Oslo Airport, Gardermoen is among the busiest in Europe. A substantial traffic is generated by CHC Helikopter Service and Bristow Norway to offshore oil platforms in the North Sea.The first aircraft to land at the airport was a de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter of the air force on 18 June 1954. At the time 800 meters (2,600 ft) of the runway was completed. Several in the year the paved section was extended to 1,500 meters (4,900 ft) and several Douglas DC-3 aircraft landed. The first revenue flight was a chartered carried out by Braathens SAFE for SK Brann, who flew to Oslo to play a football match. The military officially took the airport into use on 14 September 1954.The official civilian opening took place on 2 October 1955. By then the airport had a temporary terminal and control tower, the airport road was not paved, aviation fuel tanks were not installed and there was no snow-removal equipment Originally Bergen was served by water aerodromes at Flatøy, Sandviken, and Herdla. Financing of Flesland was largely secured through NATO funds and the airport opened on 2 October 1955. Until the 1980s, Bergen was the Norwegian airport used for SAS' intercontinental flights to New York. New terminals were opened in 1988 and in August 2017. The Bergen Light Rail was extended to the airport and opened in April 2017.
Bergen • Flesland Airport [BGO/ENBR] Norway content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Sweden • Spotting
Göteborg Landvetter Airport (IATA: GOT, ICAO: ESGG) is an international airport serving the Gothenburg (Swedish: Göteborg) region in Sweden. With just over 6.8 million passengers in 2018 it is Sweden's second-largest airport after Stockholm–Arlanda. Landvetter is also an important freight airport. During 2007, 60.1 thousand tonnes of air cargo passed through Landvetter, about 60% of the capacity of Arlanda. The airport is named after Landvetter locality, which is in Härryda municipality. It is 20 km; east-southeast of Gothenburg and 40 km west of Borås. It is operated by Swedavia, the national airport company. Since the closure of Göteborg City Airport for commercial operations, it's the city's only commercial passenger airport. The airport was opened by king Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden on 3 October in 1977. Passenger services, previously at Torslanda Airport, north of Gothenburg, were moved to Landvetter in 1977. In 2001, some budget airlines began serving the former military base in Säve, which was renamed from Säve Flygplats to Gothenburg City Airport. That airport was closed down in winter 2014–2015 because of large reconstruction needs, meaning an increase of traffic on Landvetter of almost a million annual passengers. There has been a tendency that international air travel has increased, especially on tourists, while domestic has declined somewhat (mostly business travel). In 2013 the international terminal was extended significantly with new shops, and in 2014 the domestic and international terminals were joined into a single terminal.
Göteborg • Landvetter Airport [GOT/ESGG] Sweden content media
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Admin • CHR
Sep 25, 2020
In Sweden • Spotting
Stockholm Bromma Airport (IATA: BMA, ICAO: ESSB) is a European domestic airport in Stockholm. It is located 7.4 km west-northwest of downtown Stockholm and is the closest to the city compared to the other commercial passenger airports in the area around Stockholm (Arlanda, Skavsta and Västerås). The airport was opened on 23 May 1936 by King Gustav V, and was the first airport in Europe to have paved runways from the start. During World War II Swedish and British aircraft flew to the United Kingdom from Bromma Airport. Since these flights sometimes carried Norwegian and Danish refugees the airport became of interest for German spies, and two Swedish Douglas DC-3 that had taken off from Bromma were shot down by the Germans during the war. After the war the airport flourished, two noted airlines that operated from the airport were Aktiebolaget Aerotransport (ABA) which subsequently became the Swedish partner in Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) and Linjeflyg (the Swedish main domestic airline which was later acquired by SAS). However the runway of Bromma was too short for the jet age and for intercontinental traffic in the 1960s (e.g. DC-8), and the capacity limit of Bromma could be foreseen, therefore the Stockholm Arlanda Airport was built. Also the airport, originally built in an almost rural area, became with the large raise in the population of Stockholm and associated housing projects, located inside a major city with associated noise pollution. With the opening of the Arlanda Airport in 1960–62, all international traffic moved there, the domestic traffic followed in 1983. Bromma became the domain of business jets, general aviation and flight schools in addition to government use. Several of the old hangars were separated from the airport area and turned into shopping outlets adjacent to the airport. With the start of operations by Malmö Aviation with services to Gothenburg, Malmö and London City Airport the airport has experienced something of a renaissance. Today Bromma is Sweden's third-busiest airport by passenger traffic and take-offs and landings as of 2015.
Stockholm • Bromma Airport [BMA/ESSB] Sweden content media
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